Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
MSNBCW 21
CSPAN 18
CSPAN2 14
CNNW 3
KQED (PBS) 2
CNBC 1
FBC 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 66
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)
applause. evelyn murphy, the first woman elected lieutenant governor. shannon o'brien, the first woman elected state treasurer. jane swift, the first woman to serve as governor. martha coakley, the first woman elected state attorney general. suzanne bump, the first woman elected state auditor. and elizabeth warren, the first woman senator from massachusetts in the u.s. senate. let's have a little applause right there. [applause] in addition, we have a number of other important female elected officials who have led the way for women in the state. female great and general court elected representatives, female mayors and other female-elected officials we are honored to have present as well. steve grossman, treasurer of the commonwealth. and would other male elected officials stand in support of the cause of women in politics. [applause] tonight's event was sparked by a milestone in women's political activism. 175 years ago, right here in boston, angelina grimke, a white southerner from charleston, south carolina became the first american woman to address a legislative body. tonight, we ar
. it was the first time in 1984 after the benedict of the elections that we had seen mass protests in the country and that triggered i think a response here. it was particularly felt on the campuses and it took time but i think gradually many americans started to change their attitude to everything apathetical. it's interesting in our own history, there are so few times when progressive people feel as though they were a part of something that actually led for the a change, a concrete change, not only the release of mandela but change in government and the end of apartheid. we played a role in that in a small and significant way in this country. >> we have the political system and the debate over the sangszs in 1986 that played out in this country. more broadly, what were especially in the early days of the boycott movement in this country, what is it you were up against? >> i think sean spoke to it already, economic interests at stake were powerful. we had major corporations invested in south africa, universities and other institutions in this country invested in those corporations. they were not
there was no brady bill. it took another election. the election of 1992, in which sarah brady, a life-long republican, the daughter of that fbi agent, she supported the democrat, bill clinton. she supported him because he supported the brady bill. and in the fall of clinton's first year in office, with clinton's party in control of the house and of the senate, it actually happened. >> in the east room of the white house today, it was not just an ordinary presidential ceremony, the end of a long road for jim and sarah brady, parents of the brady bill. >> that was a road more than 12 years long. but at last gun control supporters could smile. the brady bill was now law. >> and now we're here to tell the nra that their nightmare is true, we're back. we're not going away after brady. we have a lot to do. >> chuck schumer, a much younger congressman chuck schumer back then and wasn't entirely wrong when he said that. congress did pass and clinton did sign an assault weapons ban months later. when they lost in a landslide in the 1994 midterms, many democrats blamed their gun activism for it. they did so ag
of everything. it is a different philosophy than a republican would have. that if romney were elected, we would be coming out of this by now. with all this government regulation and the government goes -- the government knows best and comes first, as sky has never worked hard. arrogant,most polarizing, racist president we have ever had. the only people making excuses for him are the morally weak and politically correct liberal white apologists and the plaque -- and the black racists in the name of political correctness. everyone else is realistic enough to see the frog has dissipated and this guy is a total fraud. he will go down as one of the worst presidents this country has ever had. he does not care about the pain the americans are going through. >> joe from new york, good morning. caller: good morning. thank bush.to he was right 10 years ago when he said increasing domestic oil wouldtion in north dakota stimulate and create jobs. i remember senator kerry was opposed to that. now it and it up being right because every million barrels we produce here, we generate $60 billion per year in reve
of those problems, but when you elected phil bryant to be your governor, he stopped you from fixing those problems. you could have done it. you were doing it, and he stopped you. mississippi, you could have been kentucky, but you are staying mississippi. it is now december. happy december. that means the sign-up exchanges for health insurance have been under way for two months now, two months and one day. month two, turns out, went much, much better than month one did, went like four times better. that's the same pattern that we saw in massachusetts six years ago when we essentially piloted this same policy for the nation under romney care in massachusetts. after a terrible first few weeks on the federal healthcare.gov website, the obama administration now says the site is working for most people most of the time, which is what they were hoping for by december 1. if the health care website is, in fact, working that much more smoothly, that should smooth the way for more people to get enrolled across the country. in the first nine weeks, in general, states running their own exchanges, kent
are the ones that are going to be the most helpful in election because the anger movement and the discontentment with how this thing is going is really what gets people protesting and gets people out to the polls an gets people upset with the way things are going. >> gentlemen, thanks so much, jim eem williams, hogan gidley, great to see you. that leads us to our big question for all of you today. will the white house pr push to sell obama care defeat any gop efforts to try to sabotage the aca law? weigh in on facebook and twitter. >>> just a reminder for everybody, chris matthews will exclusively interview president obama this week as part of his "hardball" college tour coming from american university. that interview will air this thursday at 7:00 p.m. eastern right here on msnbc. you do not want to miss it. >>> immigration activists keep up their washington fast, but will their efforts translate into real reform on capitol hill? we'll take a look at that. >>> also ahead, have you heard detroit bracing for a bankruptcy ruling today. right now the judge is reading his deci
opportunities for him to regain ground. the last time was followed by a whole election year when he secondake his case for a term, defend his record. this time, you don't have a moment like that where he could say, give me another chance. so it will be a lot harder for like dig out of a hole this. >> even with three more yearles to go? inwhat point does the public washington, d.c. start to look ahead to the next president? >> quickly, given our media environment for one. and you highlighted another obstacle he's facing and trying perceptions are set. and increasingly, the closer we 2016, the there are going to be more and more fixed. o that's a big challenge the white house faces. >> you want to talk to him about president obama, the legacy, how he's dealing with the most recent issues. healthcare.gov, the rollout of the website. the criticism he received. call.us a the phone lines there. 202-585-3881. democrats, 3880. 202-55-32882. on l take your comments e-mail and facebook and twitter. i want to ask you about the end of october. inattention to detail may hurt the presidential legacy. talk
for the humanities fellowships among others. last year she was elected a fellow of the american academy of arts and sciences. a former director of the leon leavy center for buying agraph in new york. she teaches in the msa programs of the new school glover columbia university school of the arts and has taught sarah lawrence college and union college in new yorkie she was washington irving professor of modern literary. please welcome brenda wineapple and nathaniel philbrick. [applause] >> on my way over here, nathaniel and i talked about how both of these subjects are obviously the most -- among the most notable eras of american history. how could we characterize a comparative deal between your book and brenda's when it comes to intensity, and relevance, where both in the revolution and the civil war. there wasn't very much of a clear future in either era. >> i was thinking about this question when i heard about the great opportunity to be paired with brenda, and my bunker hill begins actually -- begins and ends with john quincy adams. it begins with him at seven years old, standing on a hill wi
of the main things he talked about in his election. but look at this. obamacare approval among uninsured millennials, 18-29, 57% say they disapprove of this program. it's pretty incredible when you think of how he got elected and the group that embraced him so heartily back then. >> there has long been some scepticism among millennials about the president's healthcare plan. what's new and different and most troubling for the white house is there is increased scepticism of the president himself. now you have got a situation where young people are sceptical of the law. sceptical of the reforms. they think they will pay for, they think the coverage will be worse and they are increasingly sceptical of the guy who's selling it and that's what's changed. i don't know that the president can gets that credibility back. the interesting thing is the drop in his support came after the revelations about nsa metadata collection and the coverage it got. he hasn't been able to recover among this group since that time. martha: when you look back at the election numbers, when you say did you vote for oba
for the democratic party can win elections outside of massachusetts, and is this an active debate for the democratic coalition now? >> ok, so when you poll the public on things like education, jobs -- people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at doug sosnik's recent blog post, which i think was not in "atlantic" but in "politico"? sorry. i think it is totally right that one of the great unifying factors in this country was if you work hard, and play by a set of fairness rules, you should do ok. and our guidepost was -- are our kids, the next generation, are they doing better than we are? that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in 2013, chris christie won in new jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. terry mcauliffe won in virginia, walsh in boston, deblasio in new york. toledo, the person who was pro- public education -- >> could you speak up? >> sorry. the person who was pro-education won. so there is something going on in the country t
this a high enough priority and 70% of americans support sometime if of commission on the line. the election in massachusetts wasn't a victory for public and. it was a life and independent. i've seen it coming and i've been in 46 states i think i have a very good sense. they are in the sensible center and representatives on the holes. that's why we not only have the partisanship that an ideological divide that creates a stalemate and the stalemate means that you are going nowhere fast and when things are wrong they g takeoveh patches of time. that's a disaster this scenario. so i think washington is an indicator and congress as an indicator within washington and the people basically have to put the pressure for this thing to happen. and a commission has to set the table for a tougher vot the tous because let me tell you taxes are going up and they are going up about what people than those making $250,000 a year. why? a very simple four letter word. math. in addition to social insurance contract is going to get renegotiated to make sure that when the government has a price they can deliver on
tactics or that he's an illegal alien who shouldn't have been elected in the first place and should be deported to east africa or somewhere more distant. we have a wild and wooly right wing out there that cares nothing about facts, only the need to strike a blow for benghazi, birtherism or bingo. yesterday the republican led house judiciary committee held a hearing called the president's constitutional duty to faithfully execute the laws. dana milbank is with us right now. this was an impeachment hearing. time and again, the red hots on the far right blew the bugle for driving the president from office. >> what can you do. you got to go up there and you impeach him or you go up there and you just cut funds off. you shut everything down. >> if a president is ignoring entire categories of the law, whether it be immigration, marijuana, mandatory minimum, the aca, what is the remedy for the legislative branch. >> the next recourse, the word that we don't like to say. >> we've also talked about the i word, impeachment, which i don't think would get past the senate in the current climate.
will this impact the 2014 midterm election. >> my message is going back. that seems to be the alternative that obama care critecs have. go back to the status quo. they haven't presented an alternative. if you ask opponents of the law what they would do differently? their answer is go back to the way things used to be. [ male announcer ] this is george. the day building a play set begins with a surprisewinge of back pain... and a choice. take up to 4 advil in a day or 2 aleve for all day relief. [ male announcer ] that's handy. ♪ >>> here is kramatic dash police cam video. a man walking in texas. they didn't know he was colt morgan wanted for killing his girlfriend. he reached in the waist for a concealed weapon. and the police are still looking for him today. he's not been caught. president obama said we are not going bavenlth but a head are the midterm elections. and the democrats are finding themselves in a tough spot. here is brett hume on the kelly file. >> you have 5 million people losing health insurance so far and millions more to come not to mention the people trying to use the
democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i remember one joke he used to tell when a group of journalist west were gathered in his house and we were sitting talking to him before the interview and he joked about how when he was in jail and the antiapartheid protests started he was told by someone a lot of the kids in london when they were protesting believed that free was his first name because free nelson mandela was the postcard placard they were holding up. t
that republicans since the end of the last election have been licking their wounds and trying to figure out the best way to do two things. one is close the gender gap among voters and also, try to recruit more female candidates here in congress to be members of congress. this is something that came up this morning when i interviewed the house majority leader, boehner's number two, eric cantor. here's his take. >> do you not know how to talk to women, sir? >> we have any number of republican women in our conference who are real leaders on all kinds of -- >> but is there a problem with men in the republican party, your rank and file, who don't know how to communicate to reach female voters? >> you know, it is our policies that are going to appeal to both female and male voters. >> but they haven't. >> when we're talking about health care right now, our health care starts with people and patients. >> mr. boehner a little more candid than his number two there. dana, a lot of this is obviously about trying to prevent the kind of gaffes we heard, for example, from former congressman, senate candi
of congratulations that had been sent to president-elect carter. at the same time, you know, she wouldn't miss life in politics. he had promised her long before watergate that they were going to retire in 1976. once he concluded he would not be speaker of the house, she had exacted a promise that after 1976, they would leave washington, go back to grand rapids, practice law, had no money, make a little bit of money for the kids and so on, and intervening events played havoc with that, but they left washington to go to another destination. >> host: we talked about the struggles with alcohol when he was in the house of representatives. here's what she wrote about this in the white house years. the next problem got worse and my pills were always with me. still, i didn't not drink alcoholically in the white house. there was too much at stake. what little drinking we did was confined to camp david on a weekend or drinks upstairs before we went to bed. now she said the pills were always with me. how big a problem was this for her in her white house years? >> guest: you know, i don't know how to answer th
change from journals into politics and he came the president of colombia in 2010. he was elected for a four-year term that was elected -- extended to 2014. he received more votes than any candidate in the history of colombian democracy. run for reelection and next year's presidential election. he wants to be able to finish the peace process that he started. he campaigned in 2010 on a platform to carry on the offensive against the leftist guerrillas who waged war against the government for decades. as president, he opened talks farc.he main rebel group, they reached a draft agreement recently and we expect that president santos will tell us about the negotiations and the chances for an ultimate peace agreement. these agreements could well be the central issue in next year's presidential election. one opponent is calling for an end to the peace talks. another former president of columbia says that he favors someone who's president will take a harder stance against the rebels. that join me in giving a warm press club welcome to colombian president one man well santos -- juan manuel
can't or you're a bully. i think the best debate i ever had in my four elections is against a woman and i did so well at the end that i walked out going -- she was tough. she was attacking me on every single issue. it got personal. very angry. i sort of -- i brushed it off. but it was so bad that i was walking out and they were booing her and i walked out. i felt sorry for her. right? even though she had been attacking he in whole time boy that didn't go well. the next day in the newspaper the screaming headlines were that, you know, i was a bully and it was terrible. i never raised my voice because it just went so bad for tonally it was a surprising and jarring thing. the next day when you run a campaign against a woman, especially if you're a 6'4" man you got to take extra, extra care. >> right. but there's also a ton of studies and information and evidence that shows women are negatively portrayed when they express their views firmly. i have some sympathy with how men have to address women and you can't retaliate in a way you would against a guy but women are always being seen --
and bobby cox elected to enter the hall in cooperstown, new york. the three managers winning eight world series championships. induction ceremonies will be held july 27. those are your headlines, now back to lori and adam. lori: we are continuing with our wish list theories with a sweet treat for you today. the co-owner of edwards chocolatier. bring them look at during this holiday season. welcome to you. do you do your highest volume of sales this time of year? >> yes, that is right. many do their biggest volume this time of year, december everybody is out there willing to go the extra mile and picked up the product. i really want to give it at the holiday party. lori: will they be more chocolate consuming this year versus last or prior years? >> we definitely in our business we have noticed there has been an uptick in sales this year. more people are willing to spend a little bit more on the luxury items, we have build ourselves as an affordable luxury so it is something we have done very well this year and we have seen our biggest year, this is my great grandparents started this compa
inauguration in which he explained who he was, he dropped the mask. he'd been in the '08 election, he was a rorschach test. but now he explained exactly who he was. he'd been in office for a month, there was no need for the veil. he said i'm not a clinton, i'm here to change america, and he went ahead and explained exactly how he was going to do it. trillion dollar stimulus, the largest spending bill in galactic history, and then he followed it with obamacare which is a revolution in one-sixth and a takeover of a sixth of the american economy. which to me, and i wrote at the time before he enacted all of this, made ima social democrat on the european model. very unusual for the united states. people ask me, well, what's a social democrat? the only way to explain it is with a famous anecdote about winston churchill. the labour party leader, the socialist becomes prime minister. churchill's leader of the opposition. one day he goes down to the men's room in the house of commons, and there standing alone at one of the urinals is -- [inaudible] don't worry, that's as weird as it gets. [la
for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as a ft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging retweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the broadcast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreatening signal and i will call on one and all. low on the subtleties scale, but nonthreatening anyway. he nonthreatening is what i'm concerned about. we will offer our guests the opportunity to make some opening comments and then we will move around the table. >> first of all i just want to say thank you for all of you for being here. and thank you for letting me engage in this give-and-take with everyone. can you hear me? i am an asthmatic. when i am sitting instead of standing, i have to actually really use my lungs. it is an interesting -- i riff on that a little bit, because it is interesting
after declaring independence from yugoslavia in 1992. the documents depict a newly elected president eager to address the intensifying conflict which showed no signs of resolution. in 1995, the clinton administration's international leadership led to the dayton accord which ended fighting in the region. the second story is one of intelligence support. in june 1992, the cia created the dci balkan task force to coordinate intelligence support to the policymakers on the rapidly growing balkan conflict. the clinton administration informed by the balkan task force charted a strategic policy melding humanitarian aid, economic sanctions, force and diplomacy. but the path to peace as these documents will make clear was treacherous and the administration relied on accurate intelligence to make difficult choices. the last story is the uniqueness of the documents themselves. this collection represents only a portion of the documents concerning the bosnian war. it is the youngest collection ever released in the 20 year existence of the cia's historical review program. now, before it gives our fi
" is why bill de blasio was elected. the tale of two cities as he put it. a lot of it, steve you have some charts here -- goes to affordable housing. so many elements to this story. it's not a new york city story it's a national story. mika said one in five american children live in poverty. >> it's a national story. what you have are a number of things that come together to create it. you had this terrible recession. you have the rising income equality which is fine for wealthy people to get wealthier but the people at the bottom have gotten poorer. you have reduction in food stamps. the average food stamp income has gone from $33 to $25 as part of this. you got a discussion about the minimum wage. >> you can't live on it. >> there's a whole bunch of things that come together in a perfect storm for people at the bottom and so they feel very picked upon and i think rightly so. >> joe, you would agree you got to make work pay in order to get people network. asking people to work for something they can't afford to support their family on that's not really how welfare reform works. >> i agree
clinton's rise to power. when you look at bill clinton coming to power after three disastrous elections where the democratic party was viewed as unelectable by a lot of the country, it was fueled by ideas, by platform, by a vision of where to lead to reinvent the party. and you see the great deficit in those remarks by the speaker that the congressional wing of the republican party has in the eyes of the american people, absolutely bereft of ideas. i'm not a fan of the affordable care act, but my party has no solutions to deal with what's a real issue. no working person in this country, for example, should lose their house, go bankrupt, because their kid breaks their leg or their spouse gets leukemia, so republicans, who were once the party of ideas, during the regan era, through the 1990s along with president clinton, we have collapsed as far as our ability to be policy entrepreneurs. that's the great challenge if we're to be successful in 2016, to have candidates to break away, put forward ideas about economic growth, health care, and ideas that americans are focused on. >> jonathan,
as they head into the midterm elections to be broader than just obama care, democrats realize that if this is about obama care in the mid-term elections it's not a good issue for them and even though we see positive things going on, they want things to be about more than that. for some, this is a signal about getting his mojo back. >> the president's economic policies improve government reliance rather than economic mobility and rather than tackling income inequality by lifting people up, he's been fixated on taxing some down. >> why do you think republicans seem so fixated on the government reliance narrative and this tax and spend. this tax and spend phrase that they of the to use over and over again? >> that's the only message that they've been able to promote, and i think a lot of the republican message has been similar to mitt romney's 47% comments and it's a problem for republicans because they spend the majority of the time since the 2012 elections trying to cut food stamps and we also know they oppose a minimum wage hike with respect to sequestration and they expressed
and fair and honest election. you cannot have a democracy when you arrest and harm its peaceful protesters. >> more than a thousand flights canceled today as the northeast is set to get pounded with another round of winter weather. the snow and ice blamed for a chain reaction, car accident. this one involving 50 cars. we'll tell you where this happened. and what our first read team says both democrats and republicans could be wrong about what issue will dominate next year's midterm elections. >>> plus -- >> i just don't know how it happened. i really don't. passengers got off and you think somebody would have rubbed me or pushed me, we're here. >> the worst layover ever. a man falls asleep on a plane only to wake up and find he's all alone on the plane. the big question now, how did the flight crew miss this and a large security question here. >>> join our conversation on twitter. people join angie's list for all kinds of reasons. i go to angie's list to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is
. the last time was the election year when he could make a case to defend his record. this time you do not have a moment like that way you can say give me another chance. -- dig be harder to send out of a hole like this. it is pretty easy to write off a .ame-duck resident people look for opportunities to do so in this town. you highlight another obstacle facing, digging out of perceptions. the closer we get to 2016, the more they will be fixed. that is a big challenge that this white house faces. we are speaking to scott wilson, the white house bureau chief. we are talking about recent fores, criticism received healthcare.gov. please give us a call. the phone numbers are on the screen. of course, we will also be taking your comments on e-mail, facebook, and twitter. as folks are calling in, we want to ask you about this headline in october. talk about the inattention to detail that you see here. guest: a couple things have come up recently with the national security agency eavesdropping disclosures. he said he was not aware the united states was eavesdropping on a german chancellor's p
on the house floor. hard and they've got a right to expect their elected representatives to do the same. house republicans are listening. to date the house has passed nearly 150 bills this congress that the united states senate has failed to act on. many of them would help our economy and boost job creation. nearly 150 bills passed by this house yet to be acted on by the senate. these bills would do things like increase the supply of american energy and build the keystone pipeline, roll back red tape and unnecessary regulations, provide more flexibility to working families, reform and improve job trake programs, protect -- training programs, protect americans from cyberattacks, help schools recruit and keep the best teachers, allow the american people to keep the health care plans that they'd like or to scrap the health care law that's wreaking havoc on our economy. every single one of these bills have been blocked by washington democrats. the senate, the president continue to stand in the way of the people's priorities. now we're trying to come to an agreement on the budget and on the farm bi
states, were walking out, and then president-elect mandela, just moments he was having brief meetings. after he met with the vice president, there were a few reporters, and he shuffled over and very quietly and shook our hands and asked how we were doing. on this days when, that's who he was, this quiet dignity and grace. i want to show this. the vips were given this. and some of us hung around. >> you were working for the associated press. >> at the time. this is the new stamp they issued that day, commemorating the new president, but there was a new national anthem, a new flag, an there's a commemorative stamp. these are the parliament buildings, i believe they're called the union buildings, and in this courtyard is where the ceremony w ld. you ha a who's who o wld balcony in the union building, and these generals in the military white dress uniforms, white men, handing over power to nelson mandela. at that moment everybody was crying, reporters, people in the stands, it was just amazing watching these white men in white dress uniforms essentially hand the power of south africa to t
. >> there is no doubt the system continues to be enher rently flawed and corrupt. elected politicians receiving company contribution, sitting across the table negotiating for higher pension benefits. that's just an inherent conflict that ought to be avoided. it hasn't been for generations in every state. >> the league is making promises they can't keep. >> we are negotiating with ourselves. the job with the union is to get as much. the george bush on the other side as a politician is to do the best in the city. >> the new york commuter line where four people were killed in a train wreck over the weekend should be getting back to normal. union representatives, the train's eng 94, william rockefeller says he nodded off while driving. when he came to, he shut down the throttle and tried an emergency braking tech neevenlth the drowsy feeling we sometimes get staring at divider lines when driving. nbc's tom costello has more. >> a train wreck, five cars on its side. >> reporter: as they released recordings of the transmission, engineer william rockefeller was described by his union as distraught. after year
federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreatening signal and i will call on one and all. low on the subtleties scale, but nonthreatening anyway. the nonthreatening is what i'm concerned about. we will offer our guest the opportunity to make some opening comments and then we will move to questions around the table. thank you for doing this. >> first of all i just want to say thank you for all of you for being here. and thank you for letting me engage in this give-and-take with everyone. can you hear me? i am an asthmatic. when i am sitting instead of standing, i have to actually really use my lungs. it is an interesting -- i riff on that a little bit, because it i
to wait for the next election. i caught up with one of the >> ( translated ): normally, we give them power for four years, but they've used it in the wrong way. they're corrupt so the people want the power back. >> reporter: the decision by the police to dismantle the barricades has come as a surprise. they'd spent days defending key government ministries, so i asked them why? >> ( translated ): we did this so we could talk to each other and reduce tensions, but we are not going to let the protestors do whatever they like. this decision was made to avoid further confrontation. >> reporter: for the country's prime minister, yingluck shinawatra, a small measure of relief is expected. with the nation now preparing for the thai king's birthday on thursday, she's asked people to use the time to brainstorm. but the leaders of this protest, as well as their followers, are in no mood to negotiate. we watched at the ministry of finance, which they've occupied for several weeks, as volunteers were trained to resist and besiege. they are organized and committed to their cause, and they seem increasin
election and also the recent virginia governor's election and why at least it was reported it did have an effect on women voters. >> host: what's your opinion first before we hear from dr. sommers? >> caller: my opinion, it was almost like preaching to the choir, and the way it was reported and may have seemed to be emphasized by those who believed it anyway. but in the virginia governor's election, i lived in maryland, it did seem to have an effect at least on those going to the polls, the women going to the polls. >> host: thank you, sir. >> guest: yes. the war on women theme was very effective, and what i think about that is, first of all, i mean, democrats have been far better at listening to women, being informed by various women's centers that they, with whom they correspond be, and they got their message, and they fine-tuned that message for different age groups. it was fairly clear, for example, in the last presidential campaign that the republicans did not do that. and i think that for many conservatives as i said before, there are all these women's groups that are supported.
to send national voters about obstruction. we need more compromise, and just elect overall majorities of democrats that can get stuff dun. >> until my colleagues take their party back from being seized by an extremist minority in their party, i think weir facing this. i have to tell you when i came here to washington dc it was deja vu. i'm glad that we don't have to deal with the challenges that i did during my time. >> your constituents are some of the people that will benefit from the law. i'm curious how it is playing in your district right now. california like kentucky, like new york, is one of those test cases, it wasn't in the federal exchange, the website worked reasonably well, how well is it playing in your district right now? >> very well and i know this every day from calls we get. a few weeks ago we had a townhall in my district and over 400 people turned out and we were doing enrollments on the spot and we had a townhall where we talked to people while they were waiting for their points. people came with genuine questions. the majority of the people with the exception of
's. when he got re-elected at 72 or 74, 76, something like that, there was a question when he was running is that too old? there's some senators that go to -- >> i want them to drag me out of the box. >> you're 33 years old. >> i still want them to drag me out of the box. >> they will. we don't know where you'll be by then. you're on a fast track. you are. you're a climber and you're very ambitious. >> it's hard work. >> did you see google today? >> no. >> who is this person? >> what is this? >> my computer doesn't work today. i can't see zblig she was a computer programmer. grace happa. i want to run -- happa. see her? happa. >> from the ads. >> her name is happa. >> she was a scientist. >> i never heard of her before. >> pioneer in the field. >> that doesn't mean anything. >> have you ever heard of her? >> i haven't. >> will you say that for me. >> harper. >> harper. >> when we come back, the ceo of one of the best ipos will join us on set. the stock is up 40% since may. we'll unveil the country. >>> plus, sunshine, tourism and tax breaks. florida governor rick skotd will join us on set
prisoners from the 2009 elections still being under house arrest but it would be difficult to have those conversations without a nuclear agreement. now that we have a nuclear agreement it is my hope that we can broaden the conversation. i would like to see a restoration of diplomatic relations that's not going to happen obviously for lionel. but if we have routine conversations between john kerry and javad zarif and others on a lower level that i but it does p a lot of prospects popped next month in january there is going to be a conference in geneva on serious and most likely the iranians will be there along with the saudi's and russians and others. john do you want to add anything? >> i for one have always advocated a broad agenda with iran. and it always seemed to me that the nuclear issue was that there were issues that were so vital to each side on issues of legality and nonproliferation, issues of national pride that this was going to be very difficult to resolve. and that would have happened is that we were -- if you pardon the expression -- holding the whole relationship hostage
or inconveniently, they held it until after the 2004 election when president bush was reelected. "the times" on that story for a year is why edward snowden took his rev liegss further this year to "the guardian" in britain. today, the editor of "the guardian" has only published about 1% of what edward snowden gave them. is that decision not to publish 99% an issue of bravery, intimidation? is that judgment? they are deciding, in effect, what we get to know about what our government does based on their judgment of what counts as news. and their judgment conceivably of what harm they could cause by releasing to the public what they as a news organization are privileged to know that the rest of us to do. it is a very, very uncomfortable thing. it is part of why the job of a free and responsible press is a hard thing, a hard job, hard to do well. you want the people that do it to be worthy of the responsibility they have. tomorrow morning in a law officer in danbury, connecticut. phone calls will be made available to the phone calls made the morning of the sandy hook shootings. the victims said
elections outside of massachusetts, and is this an active debate for the democratic coalition now? you poll then public, on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at the muscles in the -- if you look at doug post,ck's recent blog which i think was not in "atlantic" but it "politico"? sorry. thatnk it is totally right one of the great unifying factors in this country was if by a sethard, and play of fairness rules, you should do ok. kids,r guidepost for our the next generation, are they doing better than they are. that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in new, chris christie won in jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. virginia,liffe won in walsh in boston, palacios in new york. the person who was protested education -- >> could you speak up? >> the person who was pro- education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's
service under, dsp operations to identify problems and propose correct elections. we found six barrels remain noncompliant in this area are both cycles of our inspections. generally, bear management did not provide adequate oversight to ensure sales timelier complete. we correlation to sao noncompliance in bank into a temporary director or manager positions for advance or greater. currently, we are assessing bba's initiatives to improve claims processing and eliminate the backlog. we are reviewing the initiative vba began on april 19, 2013 to process within 60 days i'll claims over two years old. i've know, we determined 10 of 11 provisional rating decisions at the los angeles burial were not compliant with vba guidance. we found the director's office had enough conflict think i'd just ask or require provisional ratings without supporting medical evidence. concerned that additional errors they exist, we recommended that bba review for accuracy all 170 provisional rating completed by the los angeles bureau after the conflict has issued. findings from our ongoing audit of the veterans be
, increase the level of civility. if you do that, you will elect more women to public office and public service, and that is a very whole something for our country. when i encourage women to run, they say how can you even take the abuse you take in terms of the negative things that people ?ay i say they do not matter to me. if we were not effective they would not be attacking me. however, people with options do not want to subject themselves to the maliciousness that some people have out there. we know that if we can make the debate more civil and reduce the role of money, many more women would enter the arena, and that increase thet to number of women. we are very proud of our fact -- of the fact that in our caucus, the house democratic caucus, we have women, minorities and members of the lgbt community. that is a beautiful mix. i am going to ask mr. hoyer to talk about what he is here to talk about today. i am happy to talk about women all day. >> me to. , wet of all, let me say don't know what the budget parameters and any agreement are going to be. we have heard rumors. you have wri
after mandela was elected president he turned to sport to help unite his still divided country. it was the 1995 rugby world cup. mandela encouraged the nation to believe in the slogan of one team, one country. the image of mandela wearing the color and handing the trophy to the team captain was a symbol of unification. 63,000 people in the stands for the game. afterwards, the captain summed up saying we didn't have the support of 63,000 south africans today, we have the support of 42 million. we are hearing from ali tonight. he taught us forgiveness on a grand scale. his was a spirit born free destined to soar above the rainbows. today, his spirit is soaring through the heavens. he is now forever free. >> some of the best in sports. >> it really is. >> thank you, dianna. >> nbc "nightly news" is coming up next. it is a one hour special report on nelson mandela. >> s once upon a time, an insurance clerk stumbled upon a cottage. [knock] no one was at home, but on the kitchen table sat three insurance policies. the first had lots of coverage. the second, only a little. but the thi
direction for the democratic party can win elections outside massachusetts? is this an active debate within the democratic coalition right now? >> when you poll the public on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at doug sosnick recent blog post, i think he was -- which i think was not in atlantic but in the politico? sorry. i think it's totally right, that one of the great unifying factors in this country was if you work hard and play by a sense of fairness rules, you should do okay. and our guidepost was our kids, the next generation, do better than we are. and that's changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and want to do okay. and so i think that there is -- were look at the elections the just, in 2013, christie one in new jersey. that's true. but so did minimum wage expansion. terry mcauliffe one in virginia. walsh in boston. the bellagio in new york. someone -- toledo, the person -- >> could you speak up a little bit please? >> sorry. there is something going on in the country that is about, yes
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)